Bernadette Grosjean

Bernadette Grosjean
David Geffen School of Medicine at UCLA
M.D. Associate Professor of Psychiatry
Torrance, California

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Dr. Bernadette Grosjean is a native of Belgium, where she received her M.D. and her first psychiatric training (1992). After a visiting fellowship at Cornell in 1997 with Professor Otto Kernberg (World expert in the field of Borderline personality…

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Full Biography

Dr. Bernadette Grosjean is a native of Belgium, where she received her M.D. and her first psychiatric training (1992). After a visiting fellowship at Cornell in 1997 with Professor Otto Kernberg (World expert in the field of Borderline personality Disorder), she made the decision to re-train in psychiatry in the United States (2001-2005). She is now Associate professor of Psychiatry at Geffen School of Medicine at UCLA.

One of her career-long interests and specialties is the field of borderline personality disorders (BPD), a very difficult type of psychiatric disorder to treat. During the last 20 years, she has broadened her expertise into a more integrative approach, combining the knowledge of the disorder’s neurobiological underpinnings with various psychotherapeutic approaches such as Transference Focused Psychotherapy or Dialectical Behavioral Therapy (DBT).

For over 6 years she has been working as a psychiatrist in a field-based psychiatric outreach program in Los Angeles (2005-2011) -- trying to engage and help very high risk individuals, who may be homeless, in and out of hospitals or jail, psychotic or with severe personality disorder.  This has been a life changing experience for her. She is an ever more determined advocate for a humanistic and collaborative psychiatry where time, partnership with the patient/client, and a flexible approach integrating psychotherapy and pharmacotherapy are keys to success.

Her understanding of the recent discoveries in the field of neuroscience combined with her 25 years of clinical experience have reinforced her conviction that the interpersonal relationship in the healing process is essential and requires time and consistency.  Psychotherapy makes physical/biological changes in the brain. Therefore, she is particularly alarmed by the dangerous evolution of psychiatric practices (often driven by managed care), which reduce the encounter between a patient and his/her physician to a bi-annual 15-minute medication check.  She has recently given multiple lectures in the U.S. and internationally, and has written essays about that risky evolution.

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